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Since stepping foot on a college campus I have met three individuals that have been victims of sexual assault.  It is a fact that “reported assaults hit 5,983 in the 2014 fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, up 8% from last year and up from 3,604 in 2012” (TIME) and the numbers continue to rise. The question at hand: is it a good thing or bad?

Sexual assault is a major threat in the United States of America, especially on college campuses. Women seem to be the primary targets, though men are not exempt from being victims. So why, then, are rapes considered “alleged” when they occur on college campuses? The recent assault at the University of Virginia has been an eye opener. A young woman was gang raped at a Fraternity house, and the University has been reluctant to act. The University President has been reluctant to respond and the President of the fraternity claims he was absolutely clueless about what was going on. Howard University has had a similar case of the “Silent Bison”. No actions were taking, although she reported. This is not surprising considering that, according to the Huffington post, “fewer than one-third of campus sexual assault cases result in expulsion.”

I am on the Young Women of Color Leadership Council, which consist of 11 young women in high school and college, and the focal point of the organization is to ensure the well being of women, with an emphasis on a variety of issues, including sexual assault awareness and eliminating stigma. I have been on the council for several years. In addition, I have also conducted several case studies to gather information on this issue and I couldn’t believe my findings. Because of my education, my personal experiences, and my involvement in the Young Women of Color Leadership Council, I became passionate in in this work.

So I am every aware that it is a hard psychological thing to tell the story of what happened during a sexual assault. As a resident assistant, I was trained not to allow any of my residents who suffered from sexual assault to re-tell their story unless appropriate authorities so that they won’t have to keep reliving the traumatic encounter. Recently, I even read a few articles where some news sources tried to discredit the young woman from the University of Virginia. In the case of the University of Virginia, Mark Herring, the Virginia Attorney General, “called on Rolling Stone to take steps to correct errors in the story rather than simply issuing a walk-backed statement”. This trend of encouraging the nation to pick through someone’s narrative in order to give it merit is a flawed one and it is no wonder why sexual assault is one of the most underreported crimes in the country. It bothers when I can read an article in TIME and find excuses: “We learned the rules to frat life quickly, or at least we thought we did. Never let your drink out of your sight. Don’t go upstairs – where the bedrooms were housed – without a girlfriend who could check in on you later”. This is classic victim blaming, and it paints the picture that rape only occurs in Frat Houses. But sexual assault on college campuses is not just a fraternity issue. The advice the Time’s imparted was something I was told as a freshman in college. Which makes me think: Are we accepting this culture? And if so, how can we change it?

However, as I mentioned before, there is hope. Spaces that are notorious for under-reporting, such as the military and institutions of higher education, are seeing increases in victims telling their stories. President Obama even recently launched a campaign to end sexual violence on campuses and as result; I expect to see more accountability from higher institutions.

But it cannot stop there. As a college student it is important for me to know what avenues to take if sexual assault ever occurs and something has to be done to hold the individuals accountable who commit these attacks. Consider this: a study by two psychologists out of Brown University and University of Massachusetts at Boston found that ninety percent of college rapes occur from a serial rapist. This not only means that those who are committing these rapes are not being held accountable, but that if they were taken to task for their crimes, there could be a considerable decrease in rapes.

“President Obama suggests that 1 in 5 college women is a victim of sexual assault” (Washington Post).  That means that if I am in class with twenty-five women, five of them are probably sexual assault survivors. For the sake of these women, sexual assault needs to be taken seriously in all spaces, but especially on high-risk spaces like college campuses. Rapists and higher institutions that are not dealing with must be held accountable and victims must be free to share their stories, without fear of being blamed for being attacked.

Categories: Sexual Violence
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The following post was written by Christal, one of the members of Advocates for Youth’s Girl Engagement Advisory Board, who advocate for the important of prioritizing girls’ rights in the post2015 development agenda.

On Tuesday February 10, 2015, I went to my Alma Mater to advocate on the rights for girls. I was invited to go by my University’s recruitment team as my high school has the highest amount of applicants and attendees at the university. However, through my personal experience, one out of two girls suffer some amount of depression.

This is from the hands of other girls, through divisive tactics, peer pressure and cliqueism. Although it is a girls’ school, we are never taught the benefit of team work and comradery. We are instead, set against each other to compete in academia, extra-curricular activities and anything thing else popular just to get some brownie points and be better than another. Honestly, this made me a bit hesitant to revisit my Alma Mater because I knew that culture had not changed.

However, going with the objective of promoting the Girl Engagement Advisory Board gave me purpose a means in which I could address these issues without sounding like I was attacking or blaming anyone which has never been the intention.

We first began by discussing why they should consider tertiary education especially as females. Jamaica is more favourable toward women with regard to education. In most tertiary institutions, the females outnumber the males 70:1. This is because girls are taught the value of education and most schools push girls to perform at a higher level. Conversely, this results in disunity and disharmony amongst most girls due to the competitive nature of education.

I used the materials given to speak about the fact that we as girls are not represented on a global level.

Through speaking out on a cellular level on what rights girls should have, and through visiting the Girl Effect website along with becoming appraised with the Girl Declaration, we can become appraised on the global short-fall on girls’ rights along with the steps being taken to rectify these ills.

I then proceeded to hand out the material which quickly finished after about a minute. This was followed with having to tell disappointed youth that I had run out of material but that I would return with more.

I believe that the girls seeing a familiar face allowed for them to be more receptive to the message being shared. I truly hope that the materials I passed on would really rest in them and that they will become more proactive in showing others about the Girl Declaration.

#Girlsreachinggirls #Girlsteachinggirls #Girldeclaration

On the same day that I was reaching out to my past school-mates about the Girl Declaration, an act of gender-based violence occurred on my campus. A girl was viciously assaulted on campus at night due to an altercation between herself and a male that lived on campus (what we term ‘living on hall’).

The actual event did not come to light until the Thursday of the same week. Many stories began to circulate about the reasoning behind the attack (a relationship gone sour perhaps). Stories then circulated about the male attacker being very upstanding and passive aggressive. Whichever, proved to be factual, it invigorated the youth on campus to boycott the homecoming parade to be held on that day.

The pair who were involved in the altercation are both living on conflicting halls of residence. Due to that, the homecoming parade had to be postponed indefinitely to diffuse any anomy that could’ve occurred due to there being a large gathering. The protests however continued.

I used this opportunity to advocate that there needs to be open discussion about the signs of gender-based violence and how to vitiate against it. I also spoke on the fact that although there is a greater number of girls on campus, this still doesn’t mean that they are not susceptible to attacks on campus.

A point of intrigue was the fact that the hall mates of the offender (who lives on an all-male hall), joined the protest to say that they, as well are against gender based violence. This shows that there is room for debate and opportunities where our advocacy can effect change.

#Girldeclaration

 

Categories: International
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SexTechButton2

We at Advocates believe that young people have the right to accurate, age-appropriate, complete information about their sexual health. We also believe that they have the right to that information in whatever form they can get it.

Approximately 89% of young people credit the Internet as their primary source for sexual health information. So why are organizations that provide young people with tools to safeguard their health, being censored by big tech companies?

Tell Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, Yahoo, and Google, to change their restrictive policies that prevent the promotion of effective sexual health messages.

Advocates for Youth knows first hand that when sexual health organizations purchase ads on platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, they are often forced to water down their messages. Or worse, the ads are flat out rejected. Denying young people potentially life-saving information is stigmatizing, unethical, and harmful.

It’s time for these tech giants to stop contributing to the shame and stigma of surrounding youth and healthy sexuality. Young people have the right to access information and services to protect their sexual well-being, and that’s why we support this petition. Will you join us and sign today?

 

Tweet now!Tell tech giants to stop contributing to the shame & stigma of youth's healthy sexuality. Sign this petition: http://chn.ge/1zYdYBV

 

 

leftIt’s time for these tech giants to stop contributing to the shame and stigma of surrounding youth and healthy sexuality. Young people have the right to access information and services to protect their sexual well-being, and that’s why we support this petition. Will you join us and sign today? http://chn.ge/1zYdYBV

Categories: Uncategorized
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Respect is importent

We know most of the publictransportation have some reservation seat for women but they cannot valuable use by women.
Specially in the past the sit of reservation limit on called and named but now,our law is going strickly so that women is abele for use their rights and raise their voice for the use reservation seat. Traffice , police has allmost time check the public transportation to known about how to use women reservation seat and its use is good way or misuse. If traffice and police found the misuse mean others people are use in women seat they give strick punishment so todays time men are not use in women seat allmost time in any condition. they are give the rights and mean reservation seat of women for use but they not give fellings of respect just give a fear of traffice, police and punishment.
I think its does not means women got respective prospectives, behaviours and attitude from other people. However, if we want to provide women right about their researvation seat then please understand their condition , pain and do respect because respect and respective brhaviour is most importent for all women and i requst to all it not only limit on case of reservstion seat it neccessery to all activities, place and behaviours

Categories: Living Positive
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After the long wait !
After so many hardworking days!
finally my name got announced,
“EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR!”
big round of applause was there
congratulations wishes were everywhere!
and i took a long breath of happiness!
i was stunned! i was speechless!!!

literally i was about to brust into tears
remembering all those my struggling years!
wheni was standing infront of all
while evryone was saying me,”WHAT A GIRL!”
i remembered my father
who had left me!
i remembered my mother
who alone raised me!

i looked up in the sky
and showed her the award!
in a hope,from heaven
she might be watching over me!!!
because all she wanted to see me,
being#confident
because all she wanted
her daughter to be,
#INDEPENDENT!!

and it was 8pm.
ceremony ended!
while returning home alone!
i got chased!!!
and next morning
i found myself in hospital’s bed!
there was a NEWS,
“last night one GIRL been #RAPED!!!”

Categories: Sexual Violence
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They are not a people of without identity

Today i am really sad. i thinkedin our society just discrimination between male and female but i proove wrong because same like;male and female other human being live in our society they are third gender.

Human being are not birth by his/her desire so they are slowly change by their environment and thinking then they found their identity so that they change to mle to female and female to male. its things of their right but why we see their has a different and unnatural nature and behaviors? We always think that society does discrimination between male and female with we fight for their equality and rights but why not raise our voice for rights of third gender peoples?

We can see every public vehicles has provide reservation sit for women, disable people ,men but why not divide reservation for third gender? we go to public toilet you may see 2 catagories for using that male and femele but why not they divide name and establish toilet for third gender people.in the context of citizenship male and female can can easily get citizenship but third gender have not capacity for easily get citizenship. In the time of fill special form for the education, job, piblic service like; school, college, hospitals, goverment job and other private place that time almost institution has not divide the name of third gender. form are just limit on male anh female. i think also law is not totally able for provide their justice and with other people are not raise their voice in this issues and their are not intreated but if it issues of male and female they happily raise their voice why this types of behaviors are seen in our society? its not the injustice of third gender people? its a iscrimination yes………..? i think its neccessery to raise voice for third gender people because they are not a person of without identity.

They are not a people of without identity

Today i am really sad. i thinkedin our society just discrimination between male and female but i proove wrong because same like;male and female other human being live in our society they are third gender.

Human being are not birth by his/her desire so they are slowly change by their environment and thinking then they found their identity so that they change to mle to female and female to male. its things of their right but why we see their has a different and unnatural nature and behaviors? We always think that society does discrimination between male and female with we fight for their equality and rights but why not raise our voice for rights of third gender peoples?

We can see every public vehicles has provide reservation sit for women, disable people ,men but why not divide reservation for third gender? we go to public toilet you may see 2 catagories for using that male and femele but why not they divide name and establish toilet for third gender people.in the context of citizenship male and female can can easily get citizenship but third gender have not capacity for easily get citizenship. In the time of fill special form for the education, job, piblic service like; school, college, hospitals, goverment job and other private place that time almost institution has not divide the name of third gender. form are just limit on male anh female. i think also law is not totally able for provide their justice and with other people are not raise their voice in this issues and their are not intreated but if it issues of male and female they happily raise their voice why this types of behaviors are seen in our society? its not the injustice of third gender people? its a iscrimination yes………..? i think its neccessery to raise voice for third gender people because they are not a person of without identity.

They are not a people of without identity

Today i am really sad. i thinkedin our society just discrimination between male and female but i proove wrong because same like;male and female other human being live in our society they are third gender.

Human being are not birth by his/her desire so they are slowly change by their environment and thinking then they found their identity so that they change to mle to female and female to male. its things of their right but why we see their has a different and unnatural nature and behaviors? We always think that society does discrimination between male and female with we fight for their equality and rights but why not raise our voice for rights of third gender peoples?

We can see every public vehicles has provide reservation sit for women, disable people ,men but why not divide reservation for third gender? we go to public toilet you may see 2 catagories for using that male and femele but why not they divide name and establish toilet for third gender people.in the context of citizenship male and female can can easily get citizenship but third gender have not capacity for easily get citizenship. In the time of fill special form for the education, job, piblic service like; school, college, hospitals, goverment job and other private place that time almost institution has not divide the name of third gender. form are just limit on male anh female. i think also law is not totally able for provide their justice and with other people are not raise their voice in this issues and their are not intreated but if it issues of male and female they happily raise their voice why this types of behaviors are seen in our society? its not the injustice of third gender people? its a iscrimination yes………..? i think its neccessery to raise voice for third gender people because they are not a person of without identity.

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Before I ask my question, I am going to provide background information. Also, I would love to hear some advice from all of you out there once my question is asked.

August 2, 2014 was the day my parents discovered my sexuality. Of course they freaked out, they even told me they want me out the house by my 18th birthday. I was going through a very tough time and just wanted to end my life because how in the world was I suppose to actually make a living for myself while still in high school and not having the adult mentality yet? That isn’t my question.

Three months later, I fell head over heels for a friend who helped me a ton and supported me no matter what. His name is Bruno. Once my parents realized that I was dating a boy ( let me emphasis BOY) they said I can stay home and began treating me like their daughter again. Why did that make such a difference? This still isn’t my question.

Now, five months into my relationship with Bruno, I’ve come to the realization that I’m completely crazy for him, but I still love women, and he is cool with that. But there is one problem, his sister hates me and thinks I’m disgusting for liking girls and told her parents, Bruno’s parents, THEIR PARENTS! They told Bruno he should stay away from me and he, of course, rejected that motion and got even closer to me.

So, one day I decided to ask him what his parents think about him dating a girl who likes girls, and he said, “I told them you were experimenting, going through a phase”, I felt absolutely disrespected. Even though he doesn’t believe that, which people say is the most important thing, I still don’t like that his parents believe that. He is basically lying to them about who I am. MY parents even know I’m not going through a phase. Yeah, they don’t agree with it, but they at least respect it now.  When he told me that all I said was, “Cool”, and just let it slide.

Finally, my question is, should I have let it slide or have told him how I felt about it? His parents not knowing means we can be together, but it also means lying about who I am and hiding a part of me that is important to my identity.

Being an activist in Broward County Youth Council, we stress the importance of being who you are and embracing it no matter what. I know I should tell him how I feel, because not only am I standing up for myself, but it shows people that being gay is nothing to be ashamed of. I just don’t want it to put a strain on my relationship.  This is important to me because I don’t want my future kids growing up having to hide their identity to certain people to make their lives easier. If only sex ed was taught from the beginnings of time, this wouldn’t be an issue. It’s my job now, to make a change and have our future generations grow up in a society that doesn’t frown upon the LGBT individuals.

Categories: Other
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Too often, young people’s voices aren’t respected or included in decision-making processes that affect them.  That’s why Advocates for Youth (Advocates) is proud to support the Girl Engagement Advisory Board (GEAB), a team of adolescent girls aged 15-19 from Cameroon, Bulgaria, the United States, Kenya, Pakistan, Madagascar, Jamaica, Nigeria, Egypt, and Nepal. GEAB members engage in advocacy efforts to advance adolescent girls’ rights internationally and to inform, guide and advise Advocates’ efforts to elevate and secure prioritization of adolescent girls’ rights in the global post-2015 development agenda.   This week we asked them:  Why did you join the advisory board?  Here’s what they said:

In Egypt and unfortunately in many other countries, women are always less than men. They are expected to have kids and do housework and nothing else. Some are not even allowed to have a basic education or a decent job. They are also blamed for any violence against them. For example, girls may be blamed for being harassed or raped because they’re not wearing what the society thinks is “decent” clothing. Domestic violence is also justified and blamed on the woman for not being an “obedient wife”. Girls are pulled out of school and forced into marriage at a very young age because the society believes their only job is to be mothers and wives. I joined the girl engagement advisory board because people have to understand that women are not less than men, that women can be successful in many jobs and that women can be leaders. I joined because girls’ voices have to be heard. I joined because this injustice has to end. – Mai, 16, Egypt

I’ve lived in a society where is it difficult for me to walk on the street alone in the morning, let alone at night. The males make all the decisions and the woman is pushed to spend her life ‘cooking and cleaning’. As soon as she has mastered this task, she’s married to a complete stranger whom she is supposed to love and support and sacrifice for.
She isn’t an individual. She is considered a dependent load. She doesn’t have a voice. Her husband/brother/father speak for her. She’s caged, she’s oppressed and she’s internally dead.

I joined this board to change all of this. When will this oppression end? When will this unchecked harassment and sexism fade away? Only if girls could come together and unite to speak against such practices. It was a tiring task to raise the rights of girls singlehandedly in a state where the ‘Mullahs’ (Islamic Extremists) dominate the mindsets of the people. Even after collecting support for this opinion, I was criticized from society and started fearing for my future here. All I needed was a safe international platform where I could voice the opinions of the oppressed girls in my society to hope for some productive action. I’m lucky to be a part of this board which has provided me with such an opportunity to play my part to advocate the basic rights of girls to make them realize that they are not alone in this fight. - Hamna, age 17, Pakistan

“Oh look she is fat”, “Noo she is ugly”, “look at her thighs”, “look the way she walks. ” These are the things that a girl in my society has to listen and go through every day. Things like this made me realize how our society treats a girl. To overcome all the ups and downs that girls like me face every day, I joined Girls Engagement Advisory Board to empower girls and young women around me. – Muna, age 19, Nepal

There is a girl I know who is very intelligent, brilliant and smart. She comes from the northern part of my country specifically Kaduna state, Nigeria. She comes from a humble and not well to do home. Despite all challenges and problems she encountered, she finished her primary and secondary education with distinctions. After her secondary school education she traveled for x-mas celebrations in the village and while talking with her cousins her grandmother asked, now that you have finished your schooling “when are you going to come home and get married”. She was dumbfounded by the question and said nothing in reply. I am that girl.  And this is the reason why I joined the Girl Engagement Advisory Boar – so that I can advocate for girls right and keep empowering young people wherever I might find myself to make sure they fight and stand up for their rights. I wish for that day where every girl in my village, my country and the world at large would be able to go to school and not be schooled in early marriage. – Elizabeth, age 19, Nigeria

 

“But you can’t ever really say ‘no’…”
–Young girls in North Carolina

“But you’re a woman, you can’t be alone.”
–Morocco

“But you’re a girl, you need a man, and you need to have babies.”
–Kenya

“Women are only good for making sandwiches.”
–The running joke at my high school

I joined GEAB because of the young girls I met in the mountains of North Carolina who thought they had absolutely no say in having sex with someone. I joined because of the disregard I was given while traveling, that I was only worth a bride price and that I NEEDED to have a husband. That I was a waste if I wasn’t a wife and a mother. I joined because we, women, can do a lot more than make sandwiches. I joined because no person with or without religious authority can make me think that I should be placed below men.
I joined because from my own few experiences I have seen that as a girl, as a young woman, as a female I am not regarded with the same weight as a male. And I joined because that has to stop right now. – Allison, 19, United States

 

My upbringing consisted of growing up in a commune of women (namely my mother and sister). Sadly, in my country, women have always striven to be self-sufficient and could not always depend on men to support our life endeavours.

My mother has always advocated for pursuing our dreams and ambitions and had always been supportive of anything we participated in. She laid the foundation for me in empowerment, ambition and diligence.

However, I soon realized that this was not a common thread for most women in our society. Many in my country suffer from financial challenges that preclude them from pursing their education. Many girls are also told from a very young age that in order to go to school you have to ‘find a man to mind you’ (i.e. a man who will finance your education for sex). Many persons are also hesitant to use protection. Needless to say, shortly after the relationship begins and girls are able to go to school, they drop out shortly after due to underage pregnancy.

To add salt to the wound, the same persons that encourage the girls to get into relationships with men and not to use protection, demonize them for getting pregnant and isolate them from their community. The schools also bar them from continuing their education at the same institution and the girls are forced to compete to enter the only school in the country that caters to pregnant underage mothers. The males however, are not inconvenienced in their pursuits nor are they compelled to take care of their children.

My own friends became a part of this system and had very limited amounts of recourse when they are faced with challenges. My family tried to assist in the best ways we could but there are very limited avenues for advocacy for youth.

When I became aware of the opportunity to join the Girl Engagement Advisory Board, I found that it was an extraordinary opportunity to help girls who are at risk of falling into the same system due to not knowing their rights. It has invigorated me and given me a voice, platform and avenue in which I can provide solutions for girls who are at risk along with reaching out others who have the capacity to assist them. – Christal, 19, Jamaica

 

I have a group friends – girls, we are 8 of them – and we share everything with each other. One of my friends had a really strange relationship with her boyfriend. He chased after her for like 4 or 5 months, but she wasn’t sure if she wanted to get involved with him yet. Eventually he proved to her that he cared about her and that he wasserious. Everything was going very well in the beginning when we met him and he looked like a really nice guy, but everything went bad a few months after they got together. He started calling her names, lying to her and he was very rude to her without a reason. He didn’t let her see other guys because he was very jealous and on top of everything he started to be violent against her. She had bruises at her arms and chest and he slapped her a few times as well. When I saw this I decided that the something should be done and that might be happening not only to my friend, but also to other girls.

I know that I am one person and I cannot change what happens to a lot of people, but when I know that there are other girls like me, caring about this, it makes me feel encouraged to help people like my friend. – Preslava, age 19, Bulgaria

Not only was the Girl Engagement Advisory Board a way towards self discovery and a way to make use of my potentials but also an opportunity to share what I have been through , my struggles to be right where I am now. I joined the  GEAB because I don’t want other girls to live what I lived. I want to be there for them ,and make them know that they have a friend who cares for them and be ready to make a stand by being their voice. – Patricia, age 16, Madagascar

 

 

 

Categories: International
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1. Nepal- Passport’s will now have a choice between male, female, and a third gender

Nepal joins a handful of countries that recognize a third gender: citizens of Australia and New Zealand can choose from three genders for their passports – male female or indeterminate, marked by an “x” in the passport. It’s pretty cool to see the progress for the LGBTQ community!

2. India- First transgender mayor is elected to office in India

In April 2014 India accepted 3rd gender and now transgender people will legally be put in the 3rd gender category. This year they elected their first openly transgender mayor to hold office. It seems like India is on the track to lower discrimination in the LGBT community.

3. Egypt- Treating gay people horribly

On Dec. 7 a television journalist, Mona Iraqi, went to bathhouses in egypt claiming they were dens for spreading AIDS in Egypt. Her actions caused police to raid the bathhouse and put 26 men on trial for ‘debauchery’. Although It’s not illegal to have gay sex in Egypt, they were all charged with ‘debauchery’ (a term they use to prosecute sex workers). These trials and actions are causing the gay community in Egypt to hide and go underground like never before. Even though these men have been cleared of their charges, the stigma against the LGBT community continues in Egypt.

4. Uganda- Introduces first LGBT Magazine

Bombtastic is Uganda’s first LGBT magazine. They aim to cover LGBT topics and give a voice to those who are too afraid to speak up in the socially conservative country. This magazine is created for both homosexual and straight audiences so LGBTQ questions  can be answered and everyone can stay up to date about the LGBTQ community. Sounds like a good read!

5. USA- Duke application now asks about gender identity, sexual orientation

Duke now has an essay question that is LGBT inclusive. It is intended to promote diversity and show applicants that Duke is a welcoming community for anyone that wishes to apply to the school. It shows that Duke is taking great strides to be inclusive and lower the stigma that can sometimes alienate the LGBT community. Kudos to Duke!

 

http://www.voanews.com/content/uganda-introduces-gay-lgbt-magazine-bombastic/2589264.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/06/opinion/egypts-appalling-crackdown-on-gays.html?_r=0

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/madhu-bai-kinnar-becomes-indias-first-openly-transgender-woman-elected-mayor/

http://college.usatoday.com/2015/01/07/duke-application-now-asks-about-gender-identity-sexual-orientation/

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/07/us-nepal-lgbt-passports-idUSKBN0KG0QT20150107

 

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NAPD15

This March 10th marks the 20th anniversary of National Abortion Provider Appreciation Day. Let’s take this opportunity to honor and celebrate the people who risk so much to ensure access to safe reproductive health care every day.

Join us in showing your appreciation by gathering friends to send postcards of gratitude for National Abortion Provider Appreciation Day.

Every single day, abortion providers, nurses and clinic staff stand with young people, women, and their families, often at great risks to themselves, to ensure access to safe medical care – care that 1 in 3 women will need in her lifetime.

Help us flood provider’s mailboxes with postcards of support, gratitude and appreciation. Register by tomorrow to receive a box of postcards designed by our good friend, Heather Ault from 4000 Years for Choice. Gather with your friends, colleagues, and classmates to write notes of appreciation and send to your local provider.

Click here to sign up to receive free postcards to send notes of appreciation to your local abortion provider.

 

Tweet now!Show yr #abortion provider some ❤ Register by tomm. for a box of postcards 2 send to yr local provider. #NAPD #1in3 http://bit.ly/VolunteerNAPD15

 

 

tweet-now-toutThis National Abortion Provider Day, help us flood provider’s mailboxes with postcards of support, gratitude and appreciation for all that they do. Register by tomorrow to receive a box of postcards designed by Heather Ault of 4000 Years of Choice! #NAPD #1in3 http://bit.ly/VolunteerNAPD15

Categories: Abortion