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Shades of Roise

#ShadesofRosie is a campaign that seeks to start and maintain a conversation about intersectionality in our movements and in our lives. Through the feminist icon, Rosie the Riveter, we want to show how diverse women are and thus how diverse our movement has to be in order to truly fight for them. Feminism is evolving and this Women’s History Month, #ShadesofRosie is finding ways to highlight that evolution through a figure that has already seen her meaning change as society changed.

Fun Fact: Rosie the Riveter wasn’t created …

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I recently had the privilege of receiving a scholarship to attend the last day of the inaugural “Time to THRIVE: HRC Foundation’s Inaugural National Conference Promoting Safety, Inclusion and Well-Being for LGBTQ Youth…Everywhere” here in Las Vegas, Nevada. The experience was one that serves as a reminder that our movement is nothing without our youth, a reminder that I hope the organizers keep with them as they plan next year’s conference.

They had made a plea for about 100 local youth to attend their last day which their ‘Youth Day’. …

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Valentine’s Day. People seem to have this belief that you need a special someone in your life to validate you with candy and heart shaped stuff or it makes you hyper aware that you are lonely and single.

As women, we are especially prone to thinking we are supposed to feel like we are crazy in love or bitter, while eating a carton of ice cream on our couch feeling sorry for ourselves.

I’m not sure where these expectations of ourselves have evolved from, but I’m here to tell …

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Today is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Instead of writing statistical facts about HIV/AIDS in the Black community, I will share a personal story of overcoming my fear of getting tested.

I became sexually active during my junior year of college. I read everything I could about sex and contraceptives before my encounter with my first partner. The consequences of possibly getting pregnant, contracting an STI or HIV was a risk I definitely reduced by using condoms and birth control.

So why was I so fearful of getting tested …

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Are we (African Americans) afraid of knowing our status?

 

It is a fact that Black youth represent more than half of all new HIV infections. By black youth, I mean black men and women between the ages of 13 to 24. In looking at the statistic, I cannot help but wonder why?!  Are we afraid of getting tested and knowing our status? Or are we afraid of the medical community?

 

It then occurred to me that it is possible that many of us (African Americans) are afraid …