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Volunteer Training with One Royal Oak, discussing possible issues that may come up while phone banking.

Hype about DOMA (Defense of Marriage Act) has died down and our LGBT community sort of gained the right to marriage.  Notable “activist” efforts like statuses being made, profile pictures on Facebook being changed, and arguing with not so progressive relatives went on for days until the Supreme Court ruling over DOMA.  But since the SCOTUS ruling, there’s been silence and the false notion instilled in a surprising majority that we’ve finally achieved all that we needed to.  Discrimination against LGBT folks is over because we can marry in some states and a lot of straight, cis people changed their photos into equality signs!

Our community is still facing several inequities which are more dire than not being able to walk down the aisle.  What about making sure our brothers and sisters have a job and a place to live?  Only 20 states offer some protection for LGBT people in housing.  In 29 states, a person can still be fired without warning simply for being gay.  And in 34 states a person can be fired for being trans*.  Aren’t these the issues we should be engaging our friends and family with?  What’s being done about it while we’re waiting to see what happens with ENDA (Employment Non-Discrimination Act) for who knows how long?

Before anyone asks what I’m personally doing about this, I can tell people right now that I’ve joined up with a non-profit, political campaign called One Royal Oak.  Our mission is to pass a non-discrimination ordinance in Royal Oak, Michigan which would ban discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations “on the basis of actual OR perceived race, national origin, religion, color, sex, age, height, weight, pregnancy condition, marital status, physical and mental limitations, source of income, family responsibilities, educational

association, sexual orientation, gender identity, and HIV status.”

So far I’ve taken part in the volunteer training.  I participated in phone banking, trying to gather donations for the cause.  I’m constantly trying to make my friends and family understand the importance of this situation.  I believe in equality, so I’ll do what I can to help.  It’s just one city, but every little step counts.  And One Royal Oak isn’t alone in their efforts for equality in the United States.  Seek out ways to help our community either by volunteering or simply donating to activist groups like One Royal Oak, whether it’s on a local or federal level.

I’m more than happy that I have the right to marry my girlfriend thanks to the SCOTUS ruling.  But between not walking down the aisle and not sleeping on the streets, I would choose the latter.  There are many obstacles in finding a job and a place to live, our identity–who we choose to love and who we are–shouldn’t be one of them.

 

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